California Travel Ban Does Not Apply to Local Agencies

July 2017
Number 41

A California law that bars state agencies from funding travel, and from requiring employees to travel, to states that permit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression – and Attorney General Xavier Becerra’s recent expansion of the list of states covered by the ban – have raised questions regarding whether the law applies to cities, counties, school districts and community college districts.

While there is no definitive legal guidance on the issue, the law expressly applies to state agencies, departments, boards, authorities and commissions, including the University of California and the California State University system. As “state agencies,” it appears the law also applies to the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office and the California Department of Education. AB 1887 does not state that it applies to cities, counties, school districts or community college districts, nor do these entities appear to be state agencies under the law.

The acting general counsel of the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office agrees: In a June 29 legal update, he said that while the restrictions apply to the chancellor’s office itself, community college districts are local education agencies that are not covered by the ban. Still, the letter cautioned local community college districts that the chancellor’s office may not be able to approve a request for state-funded travel to any of the states covered by the ban.

Effective January 1, 2017, Government Code section 11139.8 (enacted by Assembly Bill (AB) 1887) prohibits California state agencies, departments, boards, authorities and commissions from requiring any state employees, officers or members to travel to other states that permit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression and also, from approving a request for state-funded or state-sponsored travel to a state that has passed such a law.

AB 1887 prohibits travel to any state that has enacted a law after June 26, 2015 that voids or repeals existing state or local protections against discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression or permits discrimination against same-sex couples or their families on those bases.

The original list of states covered by the ban included Kansas, Mississippi, North Carolina and Tennessee. On June 22, Becerra added Alabama, Kentucky, South Dakota and Texas to the list after those states approved laws that permit such discrimination.

Exceptions to the travel restrictions include:

  • Enforcement of California law, including auditing and revenue collection;
  • Litigation;
  • To meet contractual obligations incurred before January 1, 2017;
  • To comply with requests by the federal government to appear before committees;
  • To participate in meetings or training required by a grant or required to maintain grant funding;
  • To complete job-required training necessary to maintain licensure or similar standards required for holding a position, in the event that comparable training cannot be obtained in California or a different state not subject to the travel prohibition; and
  • For the protection of public health, welfare or safety, as determined by the affected agency, department, board, authority, commission or legislative office.

If local government agencies intend to use state grant money for travel to any of the states covered by the ban, they should check to determine if the travel restrictions are included as a condition of the grant. In addition,
local agencies may have adopted their own policies that mirror AB 1887.

Additional information about AB 1887 and the states the travel ban applies to is available on the Attorney General’s website. For more information on AB 1887, please contact the authors of this Client News Brief or an attorney at one of our nine offices located statewide. You can also visit our website, follow us on Facebook or Twitter or download our Client News Brief App.

Written by:

Stephanie M. White

Associate

©2017 Lozano Smith

As the information contained herein is necessarily general, its application to a particular set of facts and circumstances may vary. For this reason, this News Brief does not constitute legal advice. We recommend that you consult with your counsel prior to acting on the information contained herein.

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